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small to view. i think what really bothers me is spain which i think clearly bothers the whole market. the question, a growth going to fall off a cliff or whether it muddle through and a bailout will be sufficient. as you say, we don't know the answer to that question. that remains the tail risk. until we do get close to a resolution, i'm not going to turn massively bullish. >> what's your view on that? >> i think i go along very much with what he's saying. >> what is your view on what happens to spanish growth? >> i think spain has a lot of problems at the moment. it's not seeing a lot in the domestic market. not seeing it move toward an export. in which case spanish growth is going to be very, very weak for some time to come. >> all right. good to see you. thanks very much. alan will stick around. time to bring you today's global markets report. let's go to asia for the update. >> that upbeat pmi data failed to lift greater china markets. there is pessimism over general lack of policy and also fears that over 800 companies lining up for ipos could further drain liquidity out of the
's largely green behind me. the fits fits mib is atting .6%. the ibex in spain, up 0.8%. and the ftse up about 0.3%. now, some company-specific news this morning, fin mechanica saying shares up 2.4%. this on news they're set to buy sge-avio. safran is also a company considering that change. let's take a quick look at the bond space. we'll get a sense of the kind of trade we're seeing shaping up. it is consistent with flows into the periphery, perhaps out of the core and the risk on move generally that we're seeing this morning. yields up to 4.5 roughly in italy at about 5.4%, respectively. gilt is moving up towards is.9% this morning. the bund yield is still extremely low, so that spread between gilt and bund is widening. look at the euro/dollar. 1 1.3171. extraordinary. we're almost up at that 1.32 level. the dollar/yen is flat, right about 83.88. there we go. a little bit of movement there. the aussie lsh dollar is weaker. the aussie/dollar has been weakening. maybe the researchers of the yen not doing too much to spur sentiment. in any case, let's get the latest out of singapore. >> g
in the harder hit regions. ftse mib, spain up better than 1%. consistent with the rally we saw yesterday. remarkable. the xetra dax adding .1%. for its part, up to close to 30% this year. the ftse 100 adding .3. the bond space, we'll look at that and talk later about the big trades that have helped some hedge funds, for example, when it comes to greek debt. for the time being, mario's comments this summer is have techively kept the bond gleelds a tight range since then six months or so now, this is going. and differentiation across the space where italy price rising, not the case for spain which is seeing its yield up to 5.3. and i know we haven't mentioned this in a while, but i want to draw your attention here. the ten-year gild in the u.k., 1.957%. extraordinary. we're not off the 2% market in the spread, widening significantly. coming up on the program today, the count is set to get underway in south korea following general elections. we'll head to seoul to find out whether the country could elect its first female leader. >>> the bank of england releases minutes from its latest polic
regulations. last week, as he issued a one- season than. most of the big stars and their cash in spain or england. >> in england, you already know the top for your clubs before the season starts, so full credit to hourly -- you already know the top four clubs. >> the league has been plagued by hooliganism, which has resulted in an empty stands. for years, the bundesliga has drawn the highest spectator numbers of any league in europe. combined with steadily rising television rights, they have made a solid foundation for german soccer. the only thing missing is that elusive european title. >> we hope they get it. if you are just joining us, you are watching the "journal" coming to you from dw in berlin. after a short break, we will take a look of the role of german chancellor angela merkel in solving the eurozone debt crisis. >> we will be right back. do not go away. >> welcome back. >> 2012 is coming to an end, and a lot of people in europe will be happy to see the old year out. not a day went by without worrying about the future of europe. >> not just for finance experts. a to was also
the spectacle of that. >> new year's in spain, it also has an interesting tradition. it involves grapes only because the grapes sitting right here. tell me about this. >> yes, all people in spain on the strike of midnight do the following, a great spanish tradition. what they do is, they will start with one grape on the stroke of midnight and for every single minute, every second until the next minute have another grape. i thought we should try it and see how it goes. usually people in spain don't necessarily eat all the grapes, but we can try and, again, it's called the old knight and in the squares of madrid, they'll have the huge clocks chiming and the people in the square all together will do it collectively. so, as we hear the first chime, let's try it. >> do we have chimes? >> we have chimes. >> i'm going to choke if i eat more than one. worse yet, you can't kiss. how do they kiss? you can't answer because you're eating these grapes. you do this well, i think you went to spain at least once for new year's eve. >> she did much better than me. >> i dropped one. >> i have 11 sitting here.
. >> it is a rare thing for you. hang around long enough, it will go your way. thanks for that. >> cheers. >>> spain. the treasury is setting up three, seven, and ten-year bonds. they're now pre-funding for 2013. we've got the results of that in around about 30 minutes. >>> and china and india secretary growth slowed in november. analysts say china and india's nonmanufacturing team expected to improve thanks to a hiring boost in the mainland as well as strong new orders in india. at the same time, china's new leadership, as we pointed out, has laid out some fresh directives. >> these are some pretty sweeping reforms making china's famously inefficient bureaucracy more efficient. it's an effort to "win the confidence and the support of the people" as public backlash rose against the special treatment of politicians. so a new list of dos and don't's for chinese leaders. on the do side, cut down on giving face. the art of extreme flattery or reverence, which results in some very long meetings and speeches. keep them short and cut down on the lavish feasts. he's also encouraging more travel to rural par
. and, of course, it is recognized. >> what's your view on spain? the country managed to avoid bailout so far, but will not meet its deficit target for the full year. do you think spain should be given more time? >> well, first of all, i think that, again, spain is going in the right direction. when you look at the current account, the deficit, you see that it had been diminished massively since the peak that they had in 2008, 2009. and, you know, as a very short summing up, it's been divided by more than five, though it's very, very encouraging. on the other hand, you have unit labor costs which have been diminishing quite a lot and the exports of spain are very dynamic today. so it also demonstrates that hard work is being done. it's difficult. it's tough, but going in the right direction. i trust that the global observers are observing progressively and the adjustment is proceed. in spain and in all the countries that are under adjustment. >> now, lonmin's ceo ian farmer is stepping down while being treated for a serious illness after being first admitted to hospital back in august.
half a percent, as well. take a look at bond yields. we looked at that auction yesterday from spain. they raised 4.3 billion. years went lower. nevertheless spanish yields today 5.4%, slightly lower from where we closed, but they did move up substantially after a handle of 5.2. we'll keep our eye on gilts, as well. we'll look ahead to the bank of england. nothing expected from them, of course. 1.8%. david miles was the only man who voted for more qe at the last meeting. as far as currency rates are concerned, euro-dollar at the moment 1.3068, just below the highs during the says. dollar-yen fairly contained. sterling-dollar steady 1.61. so pretty much as you were on some of those compared to this time yesterday. so what about the sazian session? only one lady to tell us. >> thank you, ross. asian markets ended mix. japan's bourses outperformed the region. despite a slight improvement in november corporate sentiment showed weakness. knee sap finished lower as they planned to recall nearly 50,000 cars in japan. shanghai composite pulled back after yesterday's 3% surge. investors booke
. look at catalonia. a region in northeast spain that includes barcelona. last sunday, they held parliamentary elections. a majority of the winners campaigned on a platform of secession. the vote follows an unprecedented demonstration in september when about one million catalons marched the streets demanding statehood. to put it in perspective, the entire population is only about 7.5 million. the next step could be a public referendum on breaking away. consider scotland which has already reached that point. in october british prime minister david cameron agreed to a deal allowing scotts to vote in 2014 as to whether they want to secede. then there's the strange case of belgium. the people speech dutch in the northern region. in the southern region they speech french. the people elected a set of local leaders who want to break away from belgium. why are break away parties gaining so much momentum? it's the economy at heart. according to leading daily only 57% of national taxes paid by catalon is returned. the rest is filtered to spain's poorer regions. scots also have an eye on en
nations, such as france or spain whatever, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. so he came up with all of these arguments about what he did and that is with jefferson did. >> what did you think? >> i was not a big jeffersonian after i did all of this. he was a wordsmith. he was not a good executive when he was governor of virginia. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he was't famous until famous in the sense that we know historically now. so when he was running for president in the 17 nineties, he held in sulphide as the author of the declaration of independence. which in some ways he was. nobody even cared about that in the 1770s. but that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. he and john adams died on the same day. that is when the whole thing became a sainted document. it was god's handiwork that he -- that they died on the same day. >> would you have fit back in those days? >> up probably would have been a trouble maker -- i probably would have been a trouble maker. i probably also would have been somebody who had a strategic bent. i'm
to be credible to the other nations so they could gain from france or spain, and this was another reason for the declaration of independence, you had to make george iii out to be a tyrant. sonya, with all these arguments about what he did. that is where tempers and dead. -- so they made all these arguments. >> what did you think about jefferson? >> i did not think much. he was a words maturity was not a good governor of virginia. the british almost caught him one time. he was not able to organize effective resistance. he was not famous until he was -- famous in the sense that we know him historical now -- until when he was running for president in the 17 nineties. he held himself out as the author of the declaration of independence, which in some ways he was. nobody had cared about that during 1770 s, but it helped him. that was his claim to fame when he was running for the presidency. then when he and john adams died on the same day, july 4, 1826, and that's when the whole thing became the document that this was god's handiwork, but they died on the same day. >> knowing what you know ab
there. >> yeah. >>> coming up in the program, spain's biggest export. an analyst who says shoppers are ready to spend. >>> and the vice president hugo chavez's cancer operation that was successful. heel be in miami to speak -- we'll be in miami to speak to an an lifted who talks about the transition of power. >>> plus, joined in studio by the ceo of japanese merchandising giant sanrio. what will the man in charge of -- yes -- hello kitty have to say about holiday spending? that's at 5:20 eastern. 11:20 central/european time. >>> u.s. budget talks have intensified. president obama and house speaker john boehner spoke by phone tuesday after exchanging new proposals. aides confirm the president gave boehner a revised offer on monday, reducing demand for new tax revenue from $1.6 trillion to $1.4 trillion over the next decade. boehner responded with a plan that largely sticks by his original offer a week ago. reports say the white house has told republicans it would include an overhaul of corporate taxes in any budget deal which it hasn't put on the table before. in an interview with a
, which the germans said they should do, they should have done three years ago they'd be better off. spain is the immediate problem, you have 26% unemployment which is non-performing loans. >> we have to go, 2,200 pages of health care, i'm sure the notes spain's taken how greece has got money at every turn, their pile is a bigger pile than the health care plan. >> i could listen to you guys talk all day long. that was a great conversation. yra, rick, thanks so much. see you in a bit. >>> zynga stock popping. julia boorstin is live in l.a. with more. >> good morning to you, carl. this is the first of many steps before zynga can make money from online gambling. applying for a real money gaming license in nevada is a sign of zynga's seriousness creating new revenue streams. it sent it up as much as 9% higher today. the company warns it will take as much as a year and a half to get approval in nevada but the biggest step of all is a change in federal law, and if online gambling does become legal nationwide, zynga is sure to face some big competition from the casinos. zynga is struggling to sel
islanders. >> that's real. that's an actual team. >> west chester olives. >> spain. >> it would be nice. go there and drink martinis. tempe melted ice cream cone. what a delightful name for a team. florida panthers. the hamilton eying wigs. >> no. >> topeka leg weights. the eugene drunk makeout session in applebys. >> if we learned anything today, there won't be a hockey season. none of these posers seem to care. what the hell are you looking at? what? you want some? you want some? >> we can't even talk about this because we spent too much time talking about "love actually." take a break. back soon. >>> according to a news report 1.2 million years of porn has been watched on the web's two larnest free adult sites since launched in 2006. they have 90 billion page views. the average play time is eleven minutes. sherrod, we are a country that just plays with itself. >> we enjoy porn and everybody enjoys porn. it is natural. >> it is easier than going to the website. i do it old-fashioned. i got on demand channels and the porn channels. i have a big screen and i go at it. >> stop bragging. >> w
in wales, portugal, spain, all over. we do not know why. we do not know what to do about it. i will give an answer that will interest and amuse the previous questioner. when two things coincided in late 18th-century england, a grain surplus, the result was a cheap gin and a social calamity. they passed a few laws, licensing laws, it did not help. what turned britain around was john wesley. methodism. converting the women of england -- [laughter] that is the way it worked. it is an odd thing for me to be saying. >> you talked about the virtues freedom requires. i worked in the field of education. if our major problem children come to school without virtues, it is the public school system the place to nurture that? i believe our society and culture does not nurture those virtues. how do we address that? >> this is a good question. the family is the smallest school. by the time all lots of negligently parentage, often at no-fault to the single mother, these children get to school, and it is too late. the chicago schoolteacher it says should its first graders who do not know numbers, shapes,
and spanish fleet at trafalgar off the coast of spain. that triumph was marred by nelson's death from a sniper's bullet. the nation both celebrated his victory and mourned his death for years. nelson's column, built in trafalgar square, commemorated his sacrifice in stone and bronze. turner painted a highly original re-creation of the decisive moment that claimed lord nelson's life, setting it amid the crushing congestion of towering masts, torn sails and the fog of cannon fire at precariously close quarters. the reviews were good. (reader) "mr. turner... has detailed the death of his hero, while he has suggested the whole of a great naval victory, which we believe has never before been successfully accomplished, if it has been before attempted, in a single picture." (narrator) the napoleonic war ended in 1815 at waterloo. the duke of wellington had called the battle "a damn close run-thing." the fragility of civilization intrigued turner throughout his career. the decline of the carthaginian empire depicts the crushing penalty rome inflicted on the carthaginians. the architecture is elegant b
are investigating. spain, police arrested 35 people near madrid and seized more than 12 tons of a product of can any-cannabis. supplying the european market. belgium, chocolateers, guiness world record certifying the creation. the candy makers saying it took more than 780 hours and 2700 pounds of chocolate to make. um-huh and that's a rap on this fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. >> harris: santa, please remember to pay your taxes. that's what tax officials are telling street entertainers in cash strapped ukraine. the government there facing $9 billion in debt repayments next year. so, people who dress up as santa claus can reportedly make up to 440 bucks an hour performing in the capitol the state tax service has reminded those holiday entertainers to file forms and pay their taxes. cannot tax checks on small businesses urging ukrainian citizens to report any tax dodging santas. would you want to be the one to turn in santa? it may have been the year of the dragon in china. 2012 was filled with all source of critters and their wild moments caught on camera. next, a look back at a big year in
on the debt ceiling right this menu. when you look at how much we are spending we are similar to spain and greece. it is not a pretty scenario. >> tell me this what happens when we judge up against it? >> everybody starts wondering when we are going to raise the debt ceiling. there's a debate because they don't like to. then you have all of wall street looking at this wondering if we will be able to pay our bills. you remember what happened last time around the market sold off 2,000 points over the 2 month period. it was dramatic and hurt people's 401 k's. if you can't pay your bills you get a downgrade. >> again. >> it's not going to be good news. you know what happens you can't borrow as much money. >> that's what happens to me. >> it costs you more to borrow. all of us coming together it will be -- it could be we would be watching none of this would come to a surprise fell off the market every single day. they know what's happening. they know what's going on. it's not a surprise but nobody likes to see it. >> when they raise the debt ceiling is that to pay off debt already accrued.
of versailles soon cause the structure to crumble into the totalitarian moment. spain, of course with its civil war was the first to see the future. the fascist rose to power in italy, then germany, then a samara totalitarian culture in japan where a fascination await anyone who questioned the destiny of japan to all of asia, the remaining democracies in europe lacked the will to stop even the weakest of aggressors. when mussolini successfully crushed ethiopia, and none of the league of nations states oppose them, that's higher -- it was already dead. this of course was long before hitler invaded poland. a world war ii let me only but they say that what saved the world in our view was that the progressive liberal, new deal government of franklin d. roosevelt, most likely out of sheer desperation unleashed a productive power of free market capitalism to bury the acid towers in a tsunami of tanks, planes, and ships. anyone who's read my my books knows the statistics of pink slime just not far from where i teach, a tank was built from scratch in four and a half hours. henry kaiser's shipyard churn
and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold standard. fixed exchange rates. it is like having a single economy. -- a single currency. that gold standard creates a a degree of growth, together with the emergence of state corporations like edison that allows the bankers to run riot, and to reach far too much into the future to bring value to the peasant and to re
of developing successful long range ballistic mechanism. spain, notice the wheelchairs in the crowd of protesters. 10,000 people taking to the streets of madrid, angry that government cutbacks will crush people with disabilities. the austerity measures reducing services, closing specialty centers and laying off care workers. france, a coded letter sent in 1812 by na popoleon bonaparte, saying that force that was then. now selling for more than $243,000. that's a wrap on the fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. disaster in a state left devastated by superstorm sandy, but this one man made. a train carrying toxic car ge goes off the track and people forced from their homes for days now, and now, another setback in the cleanup efforts. and also, we've all seen our fair share of silly criminal stories, come on admit it, they never get old. and why this pair of ban did i understand could take the cake. >> i think this'll be on world's dumbest criminals, they came in here unequipped and unprepared and ended up leaving their vehicle here. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost
that slavery was less expensive than these new forms? brazil, u.s., britain, france, spain. >> a very interesting question. i think my first response would be to say i'm not sure so much that all forms of slavery disappeared as so much evolved in transition. obviously, there were laws passed that made a certain thing illegal. from a paper law stand point certain things disappeared. but the case of bonded labor it showed that things did not disappear but adapt to a different set of laws and climate. then evolved around those hurdles to continue to effect the same kind of mode of exi ployation. as to whether f there was a point in the past where producers were faced with a scenario where one set of nonslave-like labor bake more economic efficient there are certainly few instances. i think the historians here would probably have those more in their head than i do. particularly in case where is laws with penalties were perceived to be enforced. then the perception is that form of exploitation is no longer beneficial. we either have to evade it and try to do something similar or adopt for
loans were exactly the same at 4% a year in the u.k., spain, and italy. today the four rates are very different. ours has fallen markedly. rates have come in a great deal. i was -- that was the first pillar. the second is that policy would provide the vehicle for accommodating the stimulus to the economy. fiscal policy would be a head wind in terms of the movement of total demand. monetary policy would be accommodative and more importantly, would accommodate the sharp fall in the sterling exchange rate which had taken place between the end of 2007 and the beginning of 2009. that was a 25% fall in the average effective exchange rates of sterling against other currencies. the biggest since the second world war. and the monetary policy was to make sure that that gain in competitiveness was retained by ensuring that domestically generated inflation would remain stable. these pillars were thought to be consistent with the gradual recovery of the economy. what happened was we did not get a gradual recovery. we saw output being broadly flat over the past 2.5 years. it has been a zigzag patte
in southeast spain is cleaning up after revelers battled it out with flour, eggs, and -- wait for it -- firecrackers. the annual flour/egg/firecracker fight takes place on december 28 and celebrates spain's equivalent of april fool's day. to recap, that is flour, eggs, and firecrackers. jud . >> do they combine? >> yeah, like bisquick a la requirecrackers. >> some story meetings -- >> maybe next year. >> maybe. we'll see. >> thanks. >>> dylan dreyer has a check of the national forecast. good morning. >> good morning to you guys. yeah, talking about snow in the northeast. rain in the southeast. and right smack dab in the middle of the country, >>> snow will continue coming east. expect your snow chance prior to noon today. after that, it's rain. all the precipitation ending about 3:00 today. take a look because some folks are saying, where's the snow? it's west of us now between now and 9:00. that line will come to the east. we will be getting some snowfall in here, but only for about three or four hours. amounts pretty light. an inch, maybe just over that in montgomery county.
translate. a town in southeast spain is cleaning up after revelers battled it out with flour, eggs, and -- wait for it -- firecrackers. the annual flour/egg/firecracker fight takes place on december 28 and celebrates spain's equivalent of april fool's day. to recap, that is flour, eggs, and firecrackers. jud . >> do they combine? >> yeah, like bisquick a la requirecrackers. >> some story meetings -- >> maybe next year. >> maybe. we'll see. >> thanks. >>> dylan dreyer has a check of the national forecast. good morning. >> good morning to you guys. yeah, talking about snow in the northeast. rain in the southeast. and right smack dab in the middle of the country, it looks nice and sunny. it will be cold. temperatures only in the 20s and 30s. we are looking again at most areas in the northeast around one to three inches. we're not talking about a lot of flag or a lot of wind -- flooding or a lot of wind. southeastern massachusetts will be a jackpot area where we could end up with about six to nine inches of snow. the southeast will see the rain mostly through this morning. it will be h
.3%. this at a time when the unemployment rate in spain is 26%, in france it is almost 11%, and across the whole eurozone it is almost 12%. employment, already at a record high, is set to go on rising each year of the forecast, and for every one job less in the public sector, two new jobs are expected to be created in the private sector. britain now has a greater proportion of its people in work than either the eurozone or the united states of america. mr. speaker, more jobs means that the impact of the weaker than forecast gdp on the public finances have been less than some might have expected. there have been three developments that have each had a significant one-off impact on the public finances, and in the report today we publish clearly and transparently the impacts of all three. first, there is the transfer of the royal mail pension fund to the public sector at part of its privatization. this produces a one-off reduction in the deficit of 28 billion pounds this year, but it adds to the deficit in the years afterwards. second, the previous goth had class -- government had classified northe
, and pestilence. it has happened in wales, portugal, spain, all over. we do not know why. we do not know what to do about it. i will give an answer that will interest and amuse the previous questioner. when two things coincided in late 18th-century england, a grain surplus, the result was a cheap gin and a social calamity. they passed a few laws, licensing laws, it did not help. what turned britain around was john wesley. methodism. converting the women of england -- [laughter] that is the way it worked. it is an odd thing for me to be saying. >> you talked about the virtues freedom requires. i worked in the field of education. if our major problem children come to school without virtues, it is the public school system the place to nurture that? i believe our society and culture does not nurture those virtues. how do we address that? >> this is a good question. the family is the smallest school. by the time all lots of negligently parentage, often at no-fault to the single mother, these children get to school, and it is too late. the chicago schoolteacher it says should its first graders who
. and this guy says, yeah, mayans are trending. what a comeback, take that, spain. another person says, i got a message from sallie mae that tomorrow's apocalypse will not alter my student loans. and one says after tomorrow it's just cockroaches and regis. >> enjoy the end of the world, everybody. here's your polka. ♪ ♪ politics and foreign wars, all the weather, all the scores ♪ ♪ that's the "world news now" polka ♪ ♪ businesses from tokyo, that's the world of polka ♪ ♪ it's late at night and you're wide awake and you're not wearing pants ♪ ♪ have some fun, be a pal, do the "world news" polka ♪ ♪ that's the "world news" polka ♪ ♪ we're stuck here on the overnight, but that's okay because when he comes down the chimney we say hi to santa claus ♪ ♪ get us off this midnight shift ♪ ♪ that's the "world news "polka ♪ ♪ we wish you seasons greetings and the best of everything ♪ ♪ that's our christmas gift to you ♪ ♪ it's the "world news" polka do the "world news" polka ♪ >>> this morning on "world news now," solemn remembrance. today's national tri
is going to lose. ♪ impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perfect coffee. where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? >> >> brian: he dreamed of blowing up 10 synagogues in new york city. he will now spend 10 years behind bars and then deported. he got the sentence in exchange for pleading guilty. he could have gotten 32 years or if they asked me to be on the jury . it is that time of year again, the crib making its annual come back. of applause in the control room. it returns on decem
%. what we saw was the recession expanding. spain, italy, the uk, all found austerity taking its toll even more as unemployment continued to rise in some of those countries. even the large country, the economic powerhouse germany found its slelf slowing down. the root cause of it all was the inability of the european governments to come to policies to get growth started again. towards the middle and end of the year they did, but the tale was style there. very much austerity again and again. perhaps if there was only one change that took place as we moved into the fall and into the winter. it was the realization that most of these countries could take no more austerity. social welfare having been cut, health care cut, unemployment, growth virtually nonexistent. now the talk is not of more austerity, but how to get growth started again across the contine continent. suzanne. >> thank you, richard. >>> christmas, of course, is a time of giving, but there are many struggling families in boston that couldn't aafford to get their children he anything. this year for almost six decades help kamt no
you, when you look the at how much money we're spending compared to our gdp, we're similar to spain, we're similar to greece, it's not a pretty scenario. >> harris: well, tell me this: what actually happens when we nudge up against it? >> well, everybody starts wondering when they're going to rise the debt ceiling, there's big pressure on republicans in congress to approve that. it's a big debate with them because they don't like to and then you have all of wall street looking at this, wondering whether we're going to be able to pay our bills and remember what happened last time around, the markets sold off 2000 points over a two month period. it was very dramatic. and really hurt people's 401(k)'s. >> harris: well, if you can't pay your bills you get a downgrade and we've seen that we could get our credit downgraded. >> again, again, that's the not good news. because you know what happens when you have a low credit rating, you can't borrow as much money. >> harris: that's what happens-- it costs you more to borrow and that's the trouble with that and all this have coming together,
, and spain and italy, and france. they all grow slow of the they have extremely high unemployment rates. we would have a slow economy and high unemployment forever if we taxed ourselves like that. gregg: all right. >> this idea that somehow you can't tax the middle class or we won't, it's impossible. if we keep --. gregg: that is a bad idea, right, i get it. i get it. vat. that i get. >> value-added tax is the worst thing. gregg: brian, what is the solution? >> yeah. i, well, if i were king for a day and told to make the economy grow faster, i would cut the size of our federal government. we need to cut spending everywhere because, the best our economy has done in the last 30 years is during the '80s and '90s. that's when ronald reagan and bill clinton cut spending. i would take the clinton tax rates, right now, i would take them. gregg: really. >> they won't hurt the economy, if, i got clinton's spending. he spent one-third less on federal government than barack obama is today, one-third less. we've increased the size of the government by over 33%. gregg:er hereby announce you king for a d
there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold standard. fixed exchange rates. it is like having a single economy. that gold standard creates a a degree of growth, together with the emergence of state corporations like edison that allows the bankers to run riot, to bring value to the peasant and to recycle. and that is what led to t
for the christmas eve holidays. london, paris, spain have each completed shortened sessions in light of the christmas holiday as well. the friday sell-off, only five trading days are left in the year. is the market getting used to the idea that a fiscal cliff solution will not happen before year end? >> only a few hours remain to finish your christmas shopping. but some words of caution for toymakers. are tablets and apps ruining the season as kids get more accustomed to technology? >> microsoft windows 8 gets more bad press today, as "the new york times" said it is not leading to a boost in pc sales. is there anything that can turn that lagging sector around? futures moving lower, as concerns about the fiscal cliff talks weigh on the market. talks about progress toward a deal sent the down lower by almost 521 points on friday. s&p up almost 14% on the year. it's interesting, this year we've had so many unnatural phenomenon taking place, whether it's the effects of the fed's monetary policy, year end, fiscal cliff tax related issues. the motivations are a little bit different this ti
protect their own ground forces? is there something about germany and italy and france and spain and england and japan that renders them genetically incapable of having their own air forces? i know we were told, well, we have to stay in iraq and afghanistan because they don't have any air force. well, neither do the people attacking them. the next thing we are told is, well, we need to protect the u.s. from a nuclear attack. i agree. we have a nuclear capacity that far exceeds any potential combination of enemies. we had during the height of the cold war the triad. we could destroy the soviet union and they had a capacity to go after us by missiles, submarines or the strategic air command. i have a proposal, sometimes i'm kidding, this time i'm not. can we not go to the pentagon and say, you know what? now that there is no more soviet union, there is a much weaker russia, and i agree, russia won a war against georgia. they won a war against the country of georgia. i think the way we have armed the state of georgia, i'm not sure what the outcome would be if that was the war. but r
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